Help for dating violence

The Hotline is a resource for domestic violence advocates, government officials, law enforcement agencies, and the general public. Advocates receive approximately 21,000 calls each month.

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UNDERSTAND WHAT SHE IS SAYING: Devote your efforts to understanding the thoughts, feelings and experiences she has chosen to share with you - not to finding out things you want to know.

BE SUPPORTIVE: Support her feelings as well as her choice to share them with you and acknowledge that it may have been difficult to do so.

According to national research, 1 out of 3 teens report knowing friends or peers who have experienced dating abuse.

Worse, the Massachusetts Youth Risk Behavior Survey finds that 1 in 10 teens report being physically and/or sexually abused by a dating partner.

Resources for teens involved in abusive relationships include the following: The National Domestic Violence Hotline 1.800.799.

SAFE (7233) or 1.800.787.3224 (TTY) Established in 1996 as a component of the Violence Against Women Act passed by Congress, the Hotline is a nonprofit organization that provides crisis intervention, information, and referral to victims of domestic violence, perpetrators, friends, and families.

The National Centers for Victims of Crime (NCVC) 1-800-FYI-CALL A 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization supported by members, individual donors, corporations, foundations, and government grants, NCVC can help find local victim services counselors for young people in trouble.

NCVC is the nation's leading resource and advocacy organization for crime victims and those who serve them.

Often, survivors feel very alone and isolated from help, understanding and support. LISTEN: Give your friend your undivided attention as she is talking with you. It has taken a great deal of strength and courage for her to tell you.

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