Skype teen sex cam emails - Clear glass beer botttles bottom dating

In the 1700-1800s, the terms 'Ale', 'Porter', 'Beer', 'Stout', or 'Lager' meant neither more nor less than 'Beer' fermented at varying temperatures, and clarified naturally by a shorter or longer after-fermentation." Because supply did not meet the American demand, these products were widely imported into the United States from Europe in both pottery and glass bottles.

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Researcher/historian Tod Von Mechow has compiled a large quantity of in-depth information on antique beer bottles, including both pottery and glass bottles.

I would encourage anyone interested in makers’ marks on beer bottles (and soda bottles) to check out his site…..

Pottery bottles are often two tone glazed but also can be found with a solid cream color glaze. Black glass ale bottles from the 1840-1880s are largely unembossed. These bottles which also contained various soft drinks, were heavy pottery bottles with a characteristic stocky shape unlike any of the foreign import pottery bottles.

Many are stamped with a name some have cobalt blue decoration, others have various glazes in shades of cream and brown.

(If problems occur with the finished product, it can be easily ascertained which mold or mold section is at fault.) Numbers also serve other purposes, depending on the exact container and/or company being discussed. Some numbers (for instance, 3- or 4-digit numbers on the base of many British bottles) are catalog, inventory, style or design numbers assigned to a particular bottle shape.

Those numbers would serve to identify a particular bottle style, such as in communications/orders between the glass manufacturer and their customers ……is, the companies who ordered the bottles to package their products.

Hopefully this database will be of some help to those who are attempting to assign an approximate date range to a particular bottle, assuming it carries an identifiable glass manufacturer’s mark. Co.” Also, the abbreviation “Co” (Company) sometimes may be found embossed with either an upper- or lower-case “O” on various bottles made by the same manufacturer.

be a glass manufacturer’s mark and so may not be listed here. Many bottles carry only a number (or numbers) on the base.

These pottery bottles were manufactured in the 1830-1860 period.

Examples from the Midwestern states are often paneled or sided and many were molded rather than thrown on a potters wheel as were the Eastern varieties.

Giving a bottle an arched shape at the bottom means that if it does sag, it can do so without touching the bottom.

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