Advantages consolidating schools

Date: August 17, 2016 Related Categories: Administrator, Student, Teacher, What's New Related Tags: Achievement Gap, African-American students, All States, Class Size, Community Schools, Consolidation, Early Literacy, Income Related Issues, K-12, Middle School, Minority Students, Rural Innovation, School Finance/Funding, School-Community Partnerships, School/District Size, Small Schools/School Size, Title I In May 2015, Reading is Fundamental (RIF) released the report entitled, Read for Success: Combating the Summer Learning Slide.The study was designed by RIF to determine how schools and communities in the poorest and/or most rural areas could address summer learning loss, and ultimately the achievement gap, through access to opportunity, books, and learning resources.although with a noble purpose, this was met with strong opposition from parents and educators, leaving many representatives facing a wall.

Proponents of school consolidation use the quality of education as a selling point.

When two or more small schools consolidate, the resulting school will be able to offer more courses and hire more diverse faculty with teaching expertise in specialized areas.

The issue of money and what makes a great school cuts both ways in the school consolidation discussion.

Closer examination sorts out the thrust of the pros and cons of consolidation.

School consolidation either fixes budget shortfalls and creates great schools or destroys a sense of community and adversely impacts local economies.

An examination of the pros and cons reveals that each argument has it strengths and weaknesses.the extent of consolidation varies across states due to their considerable differences in history, geography, population density, and politics.Since 1995, Community Works Institute has worked with thousands of educators and schools, across the U. and internationally, providing ON SITE customized workshops and professional development.Date: February 19, 2017 Related Categories: Parent, Policy Maker, Student, Teacher, What's New Related Tags: Achievement Gap, African-American students, All States, Community Schools, Elementary School, Federal Programs, Good Rural High Schools, Graduation Rate/Dropout, Income Related Issues, K-12, School Reform, School-Community Partnerships, School/District Size, Small Schools/School Size, State Policy Dillon County, South Carolina is a poor rural community located along interstate 95, about 70 miles northwest of Myrtle Beach.In Dillon County, roughly two-thirds of students are African-American, one-third are white and 90 percent are low-income.Date: June 09, 2015 Related Categories: Administrator, Capacity Building, Collaborations, Community Advocate, Media, Networks/Groups, Parent, Place-Based Learning, Policy Maker, What's New Related Tags: Achievement Gap, Civic Engagement, Community Development, Community Organizing, Community Schools, Early Childhood, Early Literacy, Federal Programs, Graduation Rate/Dropout, Income Related Issues, Report, School-Community Partnerships, Small Schools/School Size, Youth On October 2, 2014, the U. Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights released guidance in the form of a Dear Colleague Letter to ensure that all students have equal access to educational resources.

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